Publications

Search results: 664 items found
  • Article
    3 February 2009

    In October 2008, the US-owned multinational Whirlpool [1], an industry leader
    in the manufacture of household appliances, announced its intention to shed
    5,000 jobs worldwide by the end of 2009, with over 1,000 of these job cuts
    earmarked for its European plants. The Whirlpool management cited the
    worldwide decline in demand for household appliances and the increased cost
    of raw materials as the main reasons for the cutbacks.

    [1] http://www.whirlpool.com/home.jsp

  • Article
    3 February 2009

    The Minister of Labour and Immigration, Celestino Corbacho, and Minister of
    Education, Social Affairs and Sport, Mercedes Cabrera, presented a draft of
    their reform proposals for the Spanish vocational training [1] system on 20
    October 2008. The proposal is among the measures agreed by the government and
    social partners in the framework of the structural reforms seeking to achieve
    a more sustainable model of economic development, based on training and
    investment in human capital (*ES0810019I* [2]).

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/vocational-training
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/social-dialogue-agenda-seeks-to-address-economic-crisis

  • Article
    3 February 2009

    In order to tackle its current overspending, the Irish government has
    established a ‘special group’ to be chaired by a leading and popular
    economist, Colm McCarthy. Mr McCarthy chaired a previous effort by a similar
    cost reduction ‘watchdog’ during the economic and fiscal crisis that
    beset Ireland in the 1980s. The McCarthy-led 1980s group was one element in a
    wider national drive – epitomised by the 1987 social partnership agreement,
    the Programme for National Recovery (PNR (757Kb PDF) [1]) – that paved the
    way for the so-called Celtic Tiger economy of the late 1990s.

    [1] http://www.ictu.ie/download/pdf/program_for_national_recovery.pdf

  • Article
    3 February 2009

    At a special delegate conference of trade unions belonging to the Irish
    Congress of Trade Unions (ICTU [1]) on 17 November 2008, the delegates voted
    by a large majority of 305 to 36 votes in favour of the new national deal,
    the Transitional Agreement (2.8Mb PDF) [2], under the framework of the
    Towards 2016 (2.86Mb PDF) [3] national social partnership agreement
    (*IE0606019I* [4]). The vote was underpinned by record majority ballots by
    union members in many cases (*IE0810019I* [5]). Significantly, the largest
    trade union, the Services, Industrial, Professional and Technical Union
    (SIPTU [6]) – which has tended to carry the burden of supporting these
    centralised agreements in the private sector – was joined by several other
    private sector trade unions that had in the past voted against other national
    deals.

    [1] http://www.ictu.ie/
    [2] http://www.taoiseach.gov.ie/attached_files/Pdf files/Taoiseach Report_web.pdf
    [3] http://www.taoiseach.gov.ie/attached_files/Pdf files/Towards2016PartnershipAgreement.pdf
    [4] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/social-partners-agree-new-national-partnership-agreement
    [5] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/social-partners-agree-national-deal-on-pay-and-industrial-relations
    [6] http://www.siptu.ie/

  • Article
    3 February 2009

    The global financial crisis has exacerbated the already difficult situation
    in the Italian economy, and all forecasts for the coming months predict a
    further deterioration. According to the forecasts of the Confederation of
    Italian Industry (Confederazione Generale dell’Industria Italiana,
    Confindustria [1]), Italian gross domestic product (GDP) was due to decline
    by 0.4% in 2008 and by 1% in 2009. Moreover, according to a study by the
    General Confederation of Italian Workers (Confederazione Generale Italiana
    del Lavoro, Cgil [2]), between January and November 2008 362,000 workers –
    equal to about 5% of employees in Italy – were involved in company
    difficulties and benefited in various respects from the country’s social
    ‘shock absorbers’ (/ammortizzatori sociali/) (*IT9802319F* [3],
    *IT0205204F* [4]). The latter mainly consist of special funds to support
    workers in companies undergoing severe economic difficulties.

    [1] http://www.confindustria.it/
    [2] http://www.cgil.it/
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined-working-conditions/italys-system-of-social-shock-absorbers-examined
    [4] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/industrial-relations-undefined/reform-of-social-shock-absorbers-may-help-relaunch-government-union-dialogue

  • Article
    3 February 2009

    The French Christian Workers’ Confederation (Confédération française des
    travailleurs chrétiens, CFTC [1]) held its 50th confederal congress in the
    northeastern city of Strasbourg from 28 to 31 October 2008. The gathering
    took place in a slightly tense atmosphere, as two candidates were running for
    the position of president.

    [1] http://www.cftc.fr/

  • Article
    3 February 2009

    On 27 October 2008, the commercial court in Niort – a capital of the
    Deux-Sèvres department (/département/) in western France – announced the
    decision to wind up Camif particuliers [1], a subsidiary of the French
    mail-order retailer Camif (see details in European Restructuring Monitor (ERM
    [2]) factsheet [3]). The Camif Group is the third largest mail-order company
    in France and specialises in the retail of consumer goods. The closure came
    just a few days after the announcement on 23 October 2008 that payments would
    be suspended.

    [1] http://www.camif.fr/
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/emcc/erm/index
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/emcc/erm/factsheets/camif-1

  • Article
    3 February 2009

    The notion of employee participation [1] schemes in Malta was considered a
    powerful tool in the decolonisation process, as it signified a shift in the
    industrial relations system from one based on the British oppositional
    framework to a European model. One of the participation schemes involved the
    appointment of an employee representative (in addition to government
    representatives) at board level – generally defined as a ‘worker
    director’ – in state-owned or run enterprises.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/participation

  • Article
    3 February 2009

    On 8 October 2008, the French parliament adopted a bill extending ‘active
    solidarity income’ (/Revenu de solidarité active/, RSA) at national level.
    This new form of social welfare had been introduced experimentally for a few
    months in some departments (/départements/). The bill provides for this new
    measure to replace certain existing minimum income guarantees, such as the
    ‘minimum integration income’ (/Revenu minimum d’insertion/, RMI)
    (*FR0401103N* [1]) and lone parent benefit (/Allocation de parent isolé/,
    API) (*FR0403105F* [2], see also the French contribution [3] to the
    Industrial relations developments in Europe 2006 [4] report).

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/minimum-income-scheme-reform-adopted
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/report-highlights-child-poverty
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/erm/comparative-information/national-contributions/france/industrial-relations-developments-2006-france
    [4] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/erm/comparative-information/industrial-relations-developments-in-europe-2006

  • Article
    3 February 2009

    An assessment made in the first phase of a project entitled ‘Social
    dialogue and equality in companies’ (Diálogo Social e Igualdade nas
    Empresas [1]) revealed that most companies in Portugal are not acquainted
    with the principle of gender equality [2] or how to promote it, nor with the
    competitive advantages that can arise from good practices in this domain. At
    the same time, the evaluation underlined the lack of mechanisms or tools
    supporting companies in this regard.

    [1] http://www.cite.gov.pt/dialogosocial/index.html
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/gender-equality