Publications

Search results: 664 items found
  • Article
    18 January 2009

    The Council Regulation establishing a Statute for a European company [1]
    (/Societas Europaea/, SE) is supplemented by Council Directive 2001/86/EC [2]
    on the involvement of employees in a European company. As required by Article
    15 of the Directive, the European Commission [3] published a Communication
    (46Kb PDF) [4] on 30 September 2008 reviewing the application of the
    directive with a view to proposing any necessary amendments. In preparation
    for this review, the Commission commissioned a report (656Kb PDF) [5] by
    independent experts on the implementation of labour law directives in an
    enlarged EU, as well as issuing to the Member States and the European social
    partners [6] a questionnaire together with the draft report.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/european-company
    [2] http://eur-lex.europa.eu/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexapi!prod!CELEXnumdoc&lg=EN&numdoc=32001L0086&model=guichett
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/european-commission
    [4] http://ec.europa.eu/employment_social/labour_law/docs/2008/com_2008_0591_en.pdf
    [5] http://ec.europa.eu/employment_social/labour_law/docs/2008/synthesis_report86_en.pdf
    [6] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/european-social-partners

  • Article
    18 January 2009

    In August 2008, the President of the French postal services company La Poste
    [1], Jean-Paul Bailly, announced that between €2.5 and €3.5 billion would
    be required to provide La Poste with the financial resources necessary to
    enable it to adapt to the full liberalisation of the postal services market
    in 2011 – originally planned for 2009 (*FR0502107F*). La Poste, whose
    status was changed from being part of the civil service to a state-owned
    company in 1991, has gradually been divided into separate business sections:
    letters, parcels, financial services and the network of post offices.

    [1] http://www.laposte.fr/

  • Article
    18 January 2009

    In 1976, differentiated wage scales for women and men were abolished and the
    principle of equal pay [1] for equal work was introduced in Article 14 of the
    Constitution of Malta. In 2002, through the Employment and Industrial
    Relations Act [2], the principle of equal pay for work of equal value was
    established. Official statistics showed that, in 2002, Malta had the
    narrowest pay gap (3.6%) of all the EU Member States; the average pay gap
    across all states was estimated at 17.5%. However, a 2006 study carried out
    by Allied Consultants [3] on behalf of the National Commission for the
    Promotion of Equality (NCPE [4]) – entitled the Gender Pay Review (2.95Mb
    PDF) [5] – revealed a much wider pay gap between women and men, amounting
    to 23.25%.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/equal-pay
    [2] http://www.equalrightstrust.org/view-subdocument/index.htm?id=70
    [3] http://www.alliedconsultants.com.mt/services.htm
    [4] http://www.equality.gov.mt/
    [5] http://www.equality.gov.mt/filebank/documents/FINAL Gender Pay Review Report 2007 02 02 .pdf

  • Article
    18 January 2009

    An assessment of occupational health services was commissioned and carried
    out in Lithuania in 2007, based on the findings of a qualitative survey of
    professionals and of statistical calculations made in compliance with
    national legislation. The survey covered occupational health professionals
    whose activities are directly related to the practice of occupational doctors
    in Lithuania. This criterion enabled the research to maintain a proper level
    of professionalism. The study involved specially developed questionnaires
    that ensured the anonymity of respondents.

  • Article
    18 January 2009

    Insufficient training may lead to uncertainty and a reduced feeling of
    control. Over time, a reduced feeling of control combined with high demands
    in the work situation can lead to health problems. Sufficient training in the
    workplace is therefore important and is considered a priority, as outlined in
    Section 4-2 of the Norwegian Working Environment Act (2.2Mb PDF) [1].

    [1] http://www.arbeidstilsynet.no/binfil/download.php?tid=42156

  • Article
    13 January 2009

    In early November 2008, major restructuring [1] plans affecting the Austrian
    Post Company (Österreichische Post AG [2]) were revealed by the media.
    According to an ‘internal strategy paper’ drawn up by the Austrian Post
    Company management and leaked to the media, the company’s current workforce
    of 24,000 employees is to be cut by 9,000 workers and the number of post
    offices is to be reduced from more than 1,300 at present to only 300 by 2015.
    This extensive restructuring programme was – after harsh trade union
    protests – withdrawn from the agenda of a supervisory board meeting held on
    12 November 2008 and thus not decided upon at this event. However, management
    subsequently confirmed that substantial restructuring measures would be
    inevitable in the medium term to secure the whole company.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/restructuring
    [2] http://www.post.at/index.htm

  • Article
    13 January 2009

    On 14 November 2008, the Office for National Statistics (ONS [1]) published
    the initial findings (122Kb PDF) [2] of its 2008 Annual Survey of Hours and
    Earnings (ASHE). The survey is based on data relating to 146,000 employees,
    taken from HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC [3]) tax records.

    [1] http://www.statistics.gov.uk/default.asp
    [2] http://www.statistics.gov.uk/pdfdir/ashe1108.pdf
    [3] http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/

  • Article
    13 January 2009

    In recent years, the situation of school-leavers in Germany has changed
    considerably. Many young people now encounter difficulties in securing an
    apprenticeship – in other words, a vocational training position – or
    entering the labour market. This trend is reflected in the rising number of
    so-called ‘old applicants’ (/Altbewerber/) registered at local employment
    agencies. Old applicants are defined as young people who failed to obtain an
    apprenticeship contract in the last round of applications. In 2006, for the
    first time, the share of old applicants among all applicants exceeded 50%. In
    August 2008, this percentage reached 52%.

  • Article
    13 January 2009

    On 13 November 2008, having completed its passage through parliament, the
    Employment Bill (*UK0712019I* [1]) received Royal Assent to become law as the
    Employment Act 2008 [2]. The act introduces a range of employment law
    reforms, including those outlined below. The bulk of the new provisions are
    expected to be brought into force in April 2009.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/government-sets-out-legislative-plans-in-the-employment-and-social-arena
    [2] http://www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts2008/ukpga_20080024_en_1

  • Article
    13 January 2009

    Trade unions in Sweden have been particularly critical of the government,
    demanding additional efforts and actions in the Budget Bill for 2009 in order
    to react to the increasing turbulence in the labour market (SE0810029I [1]).
    During the autumn of 2008, the trade unions and employer organisations put
    forward their own crisis plans with suggestions on how to handle the current
    economic situation.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/widescale-redundancies-in-labour-market-in-recent-months