Publications

122 items found
  • Public administration: Working conditions and job quality

    This report gives an overview of working conditions, job quality, workers’ health and job sustainability in the public administration sector (NACE 84). The findings are based mostly on the fifth European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS), which gathers data on working conditions and the quality of work across 34 European countries. Additional information on the structural characteristics of the sector is derived from Eurostat data. The sector includes all public administration activities, including defence, provision of services to the community as a whole (such as public order and fire safety activities) and administration of compulsory social security. The fifth EWCS contains responses from 2,256 workers in this sector.

  • Occupational profiles in working conditions: Identification of groups with multiple disadvantages - Executive summary

    Job quality indexes are constructed on the basis of such aspects of working conditions as earnings, prospects, working time, and intrinsic job quality (which includes skills, autonomy, the social environment, physical risks and work intensity). Occupations where job quality is consistently low are labelled ‘occupations with multiple disadvantages’, where conditions are such that it is difficult for people to stay in these jobs. This report uses data from the fifth European Working Conditions Survey to identify such occupations. It finds that workers in mid-skilled manual and low-skilled occupations do quite poorly when it comes to earnings, prospects and intrinsic job quality, and they report relatively low levels of both physical and mental well-being. However, their working time quality is generally good. In contrast, workers in high-skilled occupations do relatively well on almost all job quality indicators, except working time.

  • Occupational profiles in working conditions: Identification of groups with multiple disadvantages

    Job quality indexes are constructed on the basis of such aspects of working conditions as earnings, prospects, working time, and intrinsic job quality. Occupations where job quality is consistently low are labelled ‘occupations with multiple disadvantages’. This report uses data from the fifth European Working Conditions Survey to identify such occupations. It finds that workers in mid-skilled manual and lowskilled occupations do quite poorly when it comes to earnings, prospects and intrinsic job quality, and they report relatively low levels of both physical and mental well-being. However, their working time quality is generally good. In contrast, workers in high-skilled occupations do relatively well on almost all job quality indicators, except working time.

  • Working conditions in Zanzibar

    The first Zanzibar Working Conditions Survey, 2010, found that the incidence of physical risks, namely exposure to vibrations, noise and high temperatures, is high. The survey was based on the Global Module for Working Conditions Survey, developed jointly by the ILO and Eurofound to provide a comprehensive and systematic review of changes in quality of working life in developing countries. The Zanzibar study is presented as a follow-up and completion of the study on Working conditions in Tanzania in 2009, Zanzibar being a semi-autonomous part United Republic of Tanzania.

  • Towards better living and working conditions

    By monitoring the latest developments in living and working conditions and providing timely, in-depth analysis and information in these areas to governments and social partners, Eurofound seeks to contribute to improving the lives of citizens in Europe. The working and living conditions of Europeans are changing rapidly. To cope with the resulting impact on individuals and society, the European Union is pursuing a proactive agenda.

  • Mapping youth transitions in Europe - Executive summary

    Young people in Europe continue to experience great difficulties in the labour market. While the youth unemployment rate has started to fall in a few Member States, overall 23% of young job-seekers aged 15–24 in the EU28 could not find a job in January 2014. The number of young people who were not in employment, education or training (the NEETs group) in 2012 increased to 14.6 million, representing 15.9% of the entire population of those aged 15–29.

  • Mapping youth transitions in Europe

    Young people in Europe continue to experience great difficulties in entering the labour market. Although the youth unemployment rate in a few Member States has started to fall, overall 23% of young European job-seekers aged 15–24 could not find a job in January 2014. In 2012, 14.6 million young people across Europe were not in employment, education or training (NEETs), accounting for 15.9% of the entire population of those aged 15–29. This report analyses the labour market situation of young people in Europe, focusing in particular on their school-to-work transition, while also monitoring their more general transition to adulthood. The report also investigates the ability of young people to remain in employment against the odds during the crisis and charts their transitions from temporary to permanent contracts. The report concludes with a discussion on the strengths and weaknesses of selected policy measures.

  • ERM Quarterly - Quarter 2, July 2014

    According to the 2014 spring forecast from the European Commission DG-ECFIN, ‘the economic outlook is strengthening’ and ‘leading indicators point to GDP growth gaining momentum’. Some measure of modest growth has now returned to the majority of Member States. This issue includes: Macroeconomic trends and prospects; Job creation and job loss at a glance (1/4/14 - 30/6/14); Sectoral distribution of job losses/job gains, and top five cases; Restructuring support measures in focus: Italy; Sector in focus: Retail in the UK; Sector in focus: Healthcare in the Netherlands; Sector in focus: Tobacco.

  • Eurofound News, Issue 7, July/August 2014

    This issue contains articles on: Findings in figures; Yearbook 2013: Eurofound's findings over 12 months; Decline in volume of collective wage bargaining mapped; News in brief; and Publications.

  • Turkey: Industrial relations profile

    Turkey has a population of 75.6 million, half of which is under the age of 30. It has close to 55 million people of working age (15–64 years old). Of those, only 27 million are economically active. The unemployment rate is 9.2%. The economy has been undergoing a structural shift from agriculture and industry to services. Despite its remarkable economic performance, Turkey is still not managing to increase its employment levels. Industrial relations in Turkey are characterised by low union density, decentralised collective bargaining and hostile labour–employer and labour–state relations. Read more in this industrial relations country profile.

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