Publications

Browse publications

Latest publications

  • Article
    22 July 2003

    An agreement on the reform of pay and conditions of employment covering a
    million National Health Service (NHS) staff was concluded at the end of 2002
    (UK0303104F [1]), and ratified later in membership ballots held by trade
    unions (UK0306103N [2]). Separate negotiations between the government health
    departments, NHS employers and the British Medical Association (BMA) - a
    powerful professional association and the main trade union for more than
    100,000 doctors - proved to be more difficult. The negotiation and
    ratification of new contracts for 43,000 local doctors (general practitioners
    or GPs), and for 27,000 hospital consultants and specialist registrars,
    exposed serious tensions within the BMA and in its relationship with
    government ministers. This feature first explores the completed contract
    negotiations for GPs. It then outlines the main elements of a tentative
    agreement on a new contract for hospital consultants reached on 17 July. If
    this is accepted in a ballot of BMA members in August, it will end the threat
    of industrial action by hospital doctors.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/new-pay-system-planned-in-national-health-service
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/national-health-service-pay-reforms-ratified-by-union-members

  • Article
    22 July 2003

    Although the Danish social partners have for many years sought to present
    older workers as a vital resource for the labour market, describing them as
    'the grey gold' (Det grå guld), new studies from the Confederation of Danish
    Trade Unions (Landsorganisationen i Danmark, LO) and Danish Employers’
    Confederation (Dansk Arbejdsgiverforening, DA) show that the older people are
    when they become unemployed, the less is their likelihood of getting back
    into employment. As many as 16.2% of people in the 53-57 age group who lost
    their job before the end of 2000 were still unemployed two years later, while
    the corresponding figure for the 30-39 age group was only 5.4%. While it
    becomes increasingly difficult for all age groups to return to employment the
    longer they are unemployed, the chance of finding a new job is much smaller
    for peopled aged over 53 than for younger groups. Each time an unemployed
    person aged 53 years or over celebrates his or her birthday, the risk of
    ending up long-term unemployed increases by up to 50%. These figures come
    from an LO report entitled /Focusing on employment/ (Øje på beskæftigelsen
    [1]) which was published in May 2003 and are based on figures from the
    Ministry of Employment.

    [1] http://topmoede.dk/smmedia/OPB maj 2003 i PDF-format.PDF.PDF?mb_GUID=5B07F632-6EFD-41BA-A381-DB801D66A851.PDF

  • Article
    21 July 2003

    EU Directive 96/71/EC concerning the posting of workers in the framework of
    the provision of services [1] seeks to avoid 'social dumping' by ensuring
    that a minimum set of rights is guaranteed for workers posted by their
    employer to work in another country. The basic principle is that the working
    conditions and pay in effect in a Member State should be applicable both to
    workers from that State, and those from other EU countries posted to work
    there. The Directive covers undertakings established in a Member State,
    which, in the framework of the transnational provision of services, post
    workers to the territory of another Member State.

    [1] http://europa.eu.int/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexapi!prod!CELEXnumdoc&lg=EN&numdoc=31996L0071&model=guichett

  • Article
    21 July 2003

    EU Directive 96/71/EC concerning the posting of workers in the framework of
    the provision of services [1] seeks to avoid 'social dumping' by ensuring
    that a minimum set of rights is guaranteed for workers posted by their
    employer to work in another country. The basic principle is that the working
    conditions and pay in effect in a Member State should be applicable both to
    workers from that State, and those from other EU countries posted to work
    there. The Directive covers undertakings established in a Member State,
    which, in the framework of the transnational provision of services, post
    workers to the territory of another Member State.

    [1] http://europa.eu.int/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexapi!prod!CELEXnumdoc&lg=EN&numdoc=31996L0071&model=guichett

  • Article
    21 July 2003

    This article examines the Spanish situation, as of June 2003, with regard to:
    legislation and collective bargaining on the pay and conditions of posted
    workers (ie workers from one EU Member State posted by their employer to work
    in another); the number of such posted workers; and the views of the social
    partners and government on the issue.

  • Article
    21 July 2003

    EU Directive 96/71/EC concerning the posting of workers in the framework of
    the provision of services [1] seeks to avoid 'social dumping' by ensuring
    that a minimum set of rights is guaranteed for workers posted by their
    employer to work in another country. The basic principle is that the working
    conditions and pay in effect in a Member State should be applicable both to
    workers from that State, and those from other EU countries posted to work
    there. The Directive covers undertakings established in a Member State,
    which, in the framework of the transnational provision of services, post
    workers to the territory of another Member State.

    [1] http://europa.eu.int/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexapi!prod!CELEXnumdoc&lg=EN&numdoc=31996L0071&model=guichett

  • Article
    21 July 2003

    EU Directive 96/71/EC concerning the posting of workers in the framework of
    the provision of services [1] seeks to avoid 'social dumping' by ensuring
    that a minimum set of rights is guaranteed for workers posted by their
    employer to work in another country. The basic principle is that the working
    conditions and pay in effect in a Member State should be applicable both to
    workers from that State, and those from other EU countries posted to work
    there. The Directive covers undertakings established in a Member State,
    which, in the framework of the transnational provision of services, post
    workers to the territory of another Member State.

    [1] http://europa.eu.int/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexapi!prod!CELEXnumdoc&lg=EN&numdoc=31996L0071&model=guichett

  • Article
    21 July 2003

    This article examines the Portuguese situation, as of June 2003, with regard
    to: legislation and collective bargaining on the pay and conditions of posted
    workers (ie workers from one EU Member State posted by their employer to work
    in another); the number of such posted workers; and the views of the social
    partners and government on the issue.

  • Article
    21 July 2003

    EU Directive 96/71/EC concerning the posting of workers in the framework of
    the provision of services [1] seeks to avoid 'social dumping' by ensuring
    that a minimum set of rights is guaranteed for workers posted by their
    employer to work in another country. The basic principle is that the working
    conditions and pay in effect in a Member State should be applicable both to
    workers from that State, and those from other EU countries posted to work
    there. The Directive covers undertakings established in a Member State,
    which, in the framework of the transnational provision of services, post
    workers to the territory of another Member State.

    [1] http://europa.eu.int/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexapi!prod!CELEXnumdoc&lg=EN&numdoc=31996L0071&model=guichett

  • Article
    21 July 2003

    This article examines the Italian situation, as of June 2003, with regard to:
    legislation and collective bargaining on the pay and conditions of posted
    workers (ie workers from one EU Member State posted by their employer to work
    in another); the number of such posted workers; and the views of the social
    partners and government on the issue.

Series

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2003

    Eurofound’s European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2003, the first edition of the survey.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2007

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2007, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2012

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2012, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003. 

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2005

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2005, the fourth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2010

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2010, the fifth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • Manufacturing employment outlook

    This publication series explores scenarios for the future of manufacturing. The employment implications (number of jobs by sector, occupation, wage profile, and task content) under various possible scenarios are examined. The scenarios focus on various possible developments in global trade and energy policies and technological progress and run to 2030.

Forthcoming publications