Publications

17186 items found

Eurofound publishes its work in a range of publication formats to match audience needs and the nature of the output. These include flagship reports on a particular area of activity, research reports summarising the findings of a research project and policy briefs presenting policy pointers from research projects or facts and figures relevant to policy debates. Also included are blog articles, regular articles on working life in Europe, presentations, working papers providing background material to ongoing or already concluded research, and reports arising from ad hoc requests by policymakers. Other corporate publications include annual reports, brochures and promotional publications. Web databases and online resources such as data visualisation applications are available in Data and resources.


  • Trade union launches image and recruitment campaign

    HK, the largest affiliated trade union of the Danish Confederation of Trade Unions (LO), with 357,000 members, has launched a two-month image and recruitment campaign. DKK 4 million will be spent on newspaper advertisements and bill boards, which will be followed up by local initiatives. The campaign will aim to improve recruitment and visibility, initiate debates on objectives, and explain the utility value of being a member.
  • Early elections - no respite for the unions

    The President of the French Republic's decision to dissolve the National Assembly and to call early legislative elections in May-June 1997 has prompted numerous reactions from the unions, which fear the beginning of a shift towards liberal economic policies.
  • Government proposes economic measures to reduce unemployment

    In its bill, presented to Parliament on 15 April 1997, the Government states that the policy of austerity which has been in operation for last few years has been so successful that it is now possible to focus more on its most important goal - to halve the rate of unemployment to 4% before 2000.
  • Last wages council sets minimum wage of over GBP 4.00 per hour

    A new pay award announced in April by the Agricultural Wages Board (AWB) for England and Wales after two days of talks, gives farm workers a minimum wage of GBP 4.12 per hour. The AWB is the only wages council - setting statutory minimum pay rates for a particular sector - left in the UK after the rest were abolished in 1993 (UK9703112F [1]). When the Conservative Government was originally looking at abolishing the wages councils in 1986, the proposal was delayed because employers were not in favour of them being abolished, as they at least set some minimum floor of standards with which employers could work. The case for this was made most strongly by agricultural employers, and this was why the AWB was left in place after 1993. [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined/a-national-minimum-wage-who-what-and-why
  • New pay agreement for workers in the Swedish timber industry

    Some 25,000 blue-collar workers are covered by the agreement between the Employers' Association of the Swedish Wood Products Industry and the Swedish Wood Industry Workers' Union, reached on 4 April 1997. All employees receive across-the-board minimum pay increases of SEK 1 per hour. In addition, the local parties have SEK 0.95 an hour per worker at their disposal to allocate on an individual basis. The settlement represents an overall increase in pay of 3.1%.
  • New-style package agreed at Deutsche Telekom AG

    On 9 April 1997, the telecommunication conglomerate Deutsche Telekom AG and the Deutsche Postgewerkschaft (DPG) postal workers' union signed a package of enterprise-level collective agreements for the employees at the Telekom subsidiary Deutsche Telekom Mobilnet GmbH (DeTeMobil). After five months of negotiations, this package represents the first such collective agreement in the mobile telephony industry since the beginning of the step-by-step liberalisation of the telecommunications sector.
  • Commission to bring infringement proceedings against three member states

    Padraig Flynn, the commissioner responsible for employment, industrial relations and social affairs, announced on 3 April 1997 that the Commission is to take infringement proceedings against three member states for their failure to apply certain Community legislation in the social field. Reasoned opinions outlining the Commission's view are to be sent to France, Italy and Greece. The details of the cases are as follows:
  • Code of conduct signed to combat illegal work

    In March 1997, the social partners in Italy's leather and suede sector agreed a code of conduct providing for the application of International Labour Organisation (ILO) Conventions on the rights of workers and the employment of minors.
  • New agreement for Swedish chemical workers

    On 15 April 1997, the Almega Industrial and Chemical Association and the Industrial Union concluded a new collective agreement on wages and general terms and conditions of employment for blue-collar workers in the pharmaceutical, rubber, plastic and paint industries. It runs from 1 June 1997 to 30 April 1998.
  • Industrial conflict settled at Lufthansa

    On 9 April 1997, the airline company Deutsche Lufthansa AG, the Union for Public Services, Transport and Communication (Gewerkschaft Öffentliche Dienste, Transport und Verkehr, ÖTV) and the German Salaried Employees' Union (Deutsche Angestelltengewerkschaft, DAG) concluded a package deal, which ended months of industrial action. The DAG agreed to be covered by the Lufthansa-ÖTV collective agreements signed in October 1996. Furthermore, the deal provides for an increase in the profit-sharing bonus of DEM 100 and an overtime pay rise for cockpit employees. From September 1997, the trade unions have the right to terminate the wage agreements in the event that Lufthansa does not keep special rules which were jointly established. In addition, Lufthansa, the ÖTV and the DAG agreed on the continuation of the existing collective agreement which maintains the status quo for cabin crew, as well as the existing general agreement on pay grades for ground staff, for another three years.

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