Publications

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Eurofound publishes its work in a range of publication formats to match audience needs and the nature of the output. These include flagship reports on a particular area of activity, research reports summarising the findings of a research project and policy briefs presenting policy pointers from research projects or facts and figures relevant to policy debates. Also included are blog articles, regular articles on working life in Europe, presentations, working papers providing background material to ongoing or already concluded research, and reports arising from ad hoc requests by policymakers. Other corporate publications include annual reports, brochures and promotional publications. Web databases and online resources such as data visualisation applications are available in Data and resources.


  • New-style package agreed at Deutsche Telekom AG

    On 9 April 1997, the telecommunication conglomerate Deutsche Telekom AG and the Deutsche Postgewerkschaft (DPG) postal workers' union signed a package of enterprise-level collective agreements for the employees at the Telekom subsidiary Deutsche Telekom Mobilnet GmbH (DeTeMobil). After five months of negotiations, this package represents the first such collective agreement in the mobile telephony industry since the beginning of the step-by-step liberalisation of the telecommunications sector.
  • New pay agreement for workers in the Swedish timber industry

    Some 25,000 blue-collar workers are covered by the agreement between the Employers' Association of the Swedish Wood Products Industry and the Swedish Wood Industry Workers' Union, reached on 4 April 1997. All employees receive across-the-board minimum pay increases of SEK 1 per hour. In addition, the local parties have SEK 0.95 an hour per worker at their disposal to allocate on an individual basis. The settlement represents an overall increase in pay of 3.1%.
  • ETUC organises European Day of Action for Employment

    The European Trade Union Confederation (ETUC) has published more information about the activities to be launched as part of its "European Day of Action for Employment", to take place all across the EU as well as in some Central and Eastern European countries on 28 May 1997.
  • Code of conduct signed to combat illegal work

    In March 1997, the social partners in Italy's leather and suede sector agreed a code of conduct providing for the application of International Labour Organisation (ILO) Conventions on the rights of workers and the employment of minors.
  • Industrial conflict settled at Lufthansa

    On 9 April 1997, the airline company Deutsche Lufthansa AG, the Union for Public Services, Transport and Communication (Gewerkschaft Öffentliche Dienste, Transport und Verkehr, ÖTV) and the German Salaried Employees' Union (Deutsche Angestelltengewerkschaft, DAG) concluded a package deal, which ended months of industrial action. The DAG agreed to be covered by the Lufthansa-ÖTV collective agreements signed in October 1996. Furthermore, the deal provides for an increase in the profit-sharing bonus of DEM 100 and an overtime pay rise for cockpit employees. From September 1997, the trade unions have the right to terminate the wage agreements in the event that Lufthansa does not keep special rules which were jointly established. In addition, Lufthansa, the ÖTV and the DAG agreed on the continuation of the existing collective agreement which maintains the status quo for cabin crew, as well as the existing general agreement on pay grades for ground staff, for another three years.
  • New agreement for Swedish chemical workers

    On 15 April 1997, the Almega Industrial and Chemical Association and the Industrial Union concluded a new collective agreement on wages and general terms and conditions of employment for blue-collar workers in the pharmaceutical, rubber, plastic and paint industries. It runs from 1 June 1997 to 30 April 1998.
  • Commission reports on progress of social action programme

    In a recent report (/Social Europe/ 4/96, published in March/April 1997), the European Commission assesses the progress towards the achievement of the goals of the medium-term social action programme covering the period between 1995-7. This social action programme, adopted in April 1995, is seen by the Commission as marking a breakthrough for new ideas and policies. The basic concept underlying the programme is that social policy is a productive factor facilitating change and progress, rather than a burden on the economy or an obstacle to growth.
  • Confindustria clashes with the Government over budgetary exercise

    In April 1997, the Confindustria employers' confederation organised a "virtual demonstration "of around 14,000 employers against a government exercise to raise public revenue and reduce spending by a total of ITL 15,500 billion, deemed necessary to keep Italy's 1997 budget within the parameters set by the Maastricht Treaty on European Union.
  • Krupp-Hoesch/Thyssen merger intensifies debate on future of German stakeholder capitalism

    Just one week after the German social partners and Government found a compromise on the future development of the German mining industry (DE9703104F [1]) the Ruhr region (one of Germany's oldest industrial areas) was again the focus of social conflict. On 18 March 1997 the second-largest German steel producer, Krupp-Hoesch, announced plans for a hostile takeover of its main competitor, Thyssen. Krupp-Hoesch made an offer to the Thyssen shareholders to buy their shares for DEM 435 each, which was about 25% higher than the current quotation on the German stock exchange. The president of Krupp-Hoesch, Gerhard Cromme, stated that the acquisition of Thyssen would create a lot of synergy effects, and could help to improve the international competitiveness of the German steel industry. [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined/miners-revolt-ends-in-corporatist-compromise
  • Intransigence in tourism

    Currently the minimum wage in the tourism sector is ATS 54 net per hour. The Hotel, Restaurant, Personal Services Workers (Gewerkschaft Hotel, Gastgewerbe, Persönlicher Dienst,HGPD) is seeking an increase of the minimum gross monthly full-time wage from ATS 11,440 to ATS 12,000 (payable 14 times per year). This is a nominal increase of 4.9%. With current inflation projections running at 1.9%, a real pay increase of 3.0% would result. The minimum net monthly income would be increased by ATS 378.40 from ATS 9,358 to ATS 9,736.40, a nominal increase of 4.0%. On the basis of 173 hours per month, the net hourly rate would increase by ATS 2.18 from the current ATS 54.00.

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