Publications

925 items found

Eurofound publishes its work in a range of publication formats to match audience needs and the nature of the output. These include flagship reports on a particular area of activity, research reports summarising the findings of a research project and policy briefs presenting policy pointers from research projects or facts and figures relevant to policy debates. Also included are blog articles, regular articles on working life in Europe, presentations, working papers providing background material to ongoing or already concluded research, and reports arising from ad hoc requests by policymakers. Other corporate publications include annual reports, brochures and promotional publications. Web databases and online resources such as data visualisation applications are available in Data and resources.


  • Social partners fail to agree on minimum wage increase

    Slovak government Regulation No. 400 of 30 September 2003 (effective from 1 October 2003) stipulates a new minimum wage of SKK 35 per hour or SKK 6,080 per month. The regulation of the minimum wage and its determination by government are based on the Minimum Wage Act 1996 (No. 90). In compliance with this law, the government must set the minimum wage level annually (not later than 1 October). The minimum wage increase is calculated by multiplying the average monthly nominal wage recorded by the Statistical Office for the previous calendar year by a'coefficient of adjustment' (SK0210101N [1]). [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/minimum-wage-increased-without-tripartite-agreement
  • Thematic feature - redundancies and redundancy costs

    In November 2003, the EIRO national centres in each EU Member State (plus Norway), were asked, in response to a questionnaire, to give a brief overview of: the procedures and costs involved in collective redundancies - ie the dismissal of a number of employees for economic/organisational reasons (rather than reasons related to the individuals concerned); the levels of, and reasons for, redundancies over recent years; and current debate on the issue. The Irish responses are set out below (along with the questions asked).
  • Thematic feature - redundancies and redundancy costs

    In November 2003, the EIRO national centres in each EU Member State (plus Norway), were asked, in response to a questionnaire, to give a brief overview of: the procedures and costs involved in collective redundancies - ie the dismissal of a number of employees for economic/organisational reasons (rather than reasons related to the individuals concerned); the levels of, and reasons for, redundancies over recent years; and current debate on the issue. The Finnish responses are set out below (along with the questions asked).
  • Thematic feature - redundancies and redundancy costs

    In November 2003, the EIRO national centres in each EU Member State (plus Norway), were asked, in response to a questionnaire, to give a brief overview of: the procedures and costs involved in collective redundancies - ie the dismissal of a number of employees for economic/organisational reasons (rather than reasons related to the individuals concerned); the levels of, and reasons for, redundancies over recent years; and current debate on the issue. The German responses are set out below (along with the questions asked).
  • Working conditions: comparing the public and private sectors

    Five professional groups were examined in Les conditions de travail dans la fonction publique [1], a study by the French Ministry of Employment (research and statistical unit: DARES), published in October 2003. The five groups were: teachers, administrative workers, medical personnel, skilled and unskilled workers, and security professionals. [1] http://www.travail.gouv.fr/publications/p_detailPublication.asp?idTitre=2006
  • Innovative project to integrate unemployed people into permanent employment

    With its 5000 x 5000 project, Volkswagen AG sets out to break new ground with regard to employment, work organisation and business policy within the framework of an independent company (Auto 5000 GmbH [1]). The main goal of the project is to integrate a large number of unemployed people into a typical employment relationship [2]. The project title 5000 x 5000 reflects the objective to employ 5,000 previously unemployed people with a monthly remuneration of DEM5,000 (€2,500). [1] http://www.auto5000.de/index_e.php [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/efemiredictionary/typical-employment-relationship-0
  • Presenteeism among sick workers

    Many studies have focused on the determinants of absenteeism. Only one study (Aronsson et al, 2000) examines factors causing presenteeism. Presenteeism is the feeling that one must show up for work even if one is too sick, stressed or distracted to be productive. New results are now available from a recent survey of the Dutch work force. The analyses follow and elaborate further the Swedish study by Aronsson.
  • Social partners propose new rules on unemployment benefit entitlement

    After intense negotiations between the social partners over recent months, on 25 November 2003 they agreed to propose a tightening of the 'provisions of reasonableness' (Zumutbarkeitsbestimmungen) which govern the conditions under which unemployed people may refuse a job offered by the Labour Market Service (Arbeitsmarktservice, AMS) without losing their entitlement to unemployment benefits (AT0303202F [1]). The social partners’ agreement provides that the period during which unemployed people may refuse to take up a job unrelated to their previous occupation (known as the Berufsschutz) should be reduced to the first 100 days of unemployment. As a compensation, a 'pay guarantee' (Entgeltschutz) should be introduced, whereby, for a period of 120 days from the first day of unemployment, unemployed people may refuse a job offered if the pay is below of 80% of the their previous earnings liable to unemployment insurance contributions (Bemessungsgrundlage). After this 120-day period, the minimum would be reduced to 75%. [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/new-government-calls-for-eur-1000-monthly-minimum-wage
  • Social partners and government discuss healthcare reform

    In April 2003, the Slovenian government and social partners signed a 'social agreement [1] ' for 2003-5, setting the general direction for economic and social development over the next two years and defining the tasks of the signatories (SI0307101F [2]). One issue covered by the agreement is healthcare reform, on which the signatories agreed that: [1] http://www.gov.si/mddsz/doc/soc_sporazum_an.pdf [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/tripartite-social-agreement-signed-for-2003-5
  • Participation through employees' councils

    The 1993 Law on the Participation of Workers in Management (LPWM) regulates employee participation (notably in the form of information, consultation and co-determination), putting into effect Article 75 of the 1991 Slovene Constitution, which states that 'employees shall participate in the management of commercial organisations and institutions in a manner and under conditions provided by law'.

Pages