Publications

Search results: 948 items found
  • Article
    21 December 2005

    The ordinance of the Slovak government No. 428 of 14 September 2005 increased
    the gross monthly minimum wage by SKK 400 from 1 October 2005. The monthly
    minimum wage is now SKK 6,900 or SKK 39.70 per hour. The Government based its
    decision on the provisions of Act No. 90/1996 on the minimum wage as amended
    whereby the Government increases the minimum wage on 1 October each calendar
    year.

  • Article
    21 December 2005

    EU Council Regulation (EC) No. 2157/2001 [1] on the Statute for a European
    Company (hereinafter the SE Regulation) gives companies the option of forming
    a European Company (Societas Europaea, SE) which can operate on a Europe-wide
    basis and be governed by Community law directly applicable in all Member
    States (rather than national law). It came directly into force across the EU
    on 8 October 2004.

    [1] http://europa.eu.int/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexapi!prod!CELEXnumdoc&lg=en&numdoc=32001R2157&model=guichett

  • Article
    21 December 2005

    This article looks at the impact of amendments to the Act regarding the
    promotion of employment and labour market iInstitutions. In particular it
    looks at how ‘activation contracts’ and state employment schemes will
    affect unemployment rates in Poland.

  • Article
    21 December 2005

    A recent report by the research institute FAFO, published in October 2005,
    shows that the trade union movement is not doing enough to embrace ethnic
    minorities. While approximately 100,000 immigrants from non-Western countries
    are currently employed in the Norwegian labour market, not one of them
    participated in the Norwegian Confederation of Trade Unions
    (Landsorganisasjonen i Norge, LO) National Congress in 2005. If the
    composition of the 315 delegates were to represent the ethnic make-up of the
    Norwegian workforce, there should have been 14 non-western delegates in
    attendance. FAFA examines how five different national trade unions within LO
    have responded to the question of including ethnic minorities. It reveals
    that the Norwegian trade union movement is not fully realising its potential
    by failing to take into account this group, and that ethnic minorities are
    strongly underrepresented in the different trade union bodies .

  • Article
    21 December 2005

    A recent survey conducted at the beginning of 2005 by Apq, the Italian
    association of professionals and middle managers (affiliated to the Italian
    Confederation of Workers’ Unions, Cisl) looked at the role of middle
    management. The survey reveals that middle managers work more than in the
    past, have higher job flexibility, less spare time, approve of training but
    dislike the changes in the workplace that arise through technological
    innovation, and above all, earn less money.

  • Article
    21 December 2005

    In the course of Hungary's transition from the state-socialist system to
    parliamentary democracy, the employers’ organisations that existed under
    the socialist regime had to face the disappearance of their exclusive and
    monopolistic privileges in the representation of business interests. The
    socialist-era associations used to organise distinct segments of the economy
    that were separated artificially by the regime following the socialist notion
    of ownership-types - such as state-owned companies, industrial cooperatives
    and private micro firms. Membership was practically compulsory. However, the
    negotiated nature of the transition made it possible for the employers'
    bodies to reform themselves in order to preserve organisational continuity
    and to adapt to the new environment. At the same time, new organisations were
    set up to represent new interest groups. This dual process has resulted in a
    highly fragmented representation structure of business interests.

  • Article
    21 December 2005

    At the 2005 Conference on the Family, the government announced several new
    policies, including a mini-reform of paid parental leave. These announcements
    have not been greeted with unanimous approval by trade unions.

  • Article
    21 December 2005

    The Nordic-Baltic Project [1] was launched in spring 2004 by several
    manufacturing and construction sector trade union organisations from the
    Nordic states - Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden - which worked
    in close cooperation with more than 20 Baltic industrial trade unions in the
    project. The aim of the scheme, which ends in December 2005, has been to
    examine the position of trade unions in the Baltic States (Estonia, Latvia
    and Lithuania), where Nordic firms have expanded rapidly in recent years (for
    information on Finnish investment in the region, see FI0407203F [2]) As part
    of the project, Markku Sippola of the University of Jyväskylä in Finland
    has conducted research on industrial relations at Nordic-owned construction
    and manufacturing companies. This article presents some of Mr Sippola’s
    findings from the two studies he conducted as part of the Nordic-Baltic
    Project. The first of these was published in May 2005 and the second in
    November 2005.

    [1] http://www.baltictu.net/project/strategyandprojectplanEN.pdf
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/finnish-labour-intensive-manufacturers-expand-into-new-member-states

  • Article
    21 December 2005

    In recent years, the National Agreements for Continuing Training (ANFCs) have
    established a continuing training subsystem. It was initially centralised and
    based mainly on the initiative of the social partners, but the 2004 reform
    decentralised the management to the autonomous communities, which led to a
    greater involvement by the government at different levels. The ANFCs have
    fostered social consultation in the framework of industrial relations that,
    albeit with limited effects, has developed continuing training. A large
    percentage of the collective agreements - particularly sectoral ones - adhere
    to the ANFCs and they are responsible for developing them. This article looks
    at how the signatories view the way in which training is dealt with in
    collective agreements.

  • Article
    21 December 2005

    In November 2005, the Estonian Employers’ Confederation (Eesti Tööandjate
    Keskliit, ETTK [1]) (EE0310102F [2]) and the PRAXIS Center for Policy Studies
    [3] published a study [4] of employee participation in Estonian companies,
    written by two economists from PRAXIS (Epp Kallaste and Krista Jaakson). The
    subject of employee participation in companies has been very little studied
    in Estonia and there is no information on the extent to which employees’
    representatives are involved in the decision-making process. The aim of the
    study is to provide an overview of other countries’ experiences in the
    field of employee participation and to analyse how participation works under
    the various forms of employee representation found in Estonia.

    [1] http://www.ettk.ee/
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/the-development-and-current-situation-of-employers-organisations-1
    [3] http://www.praxis.ee/
    [4] http://www.ettk.ee/upload/koolitus_fail/Partnerlus/ETTK_uuring2005_EST.pdf