Tackling undeclared work database

Undeclared work can be defined as work which is in itself legal but is not declared to the authorities for tax, social security and/or labour law purposes. Across the 28 Member States of the European Union, a great deal of effort is being invested into developing and testing policy measures that aim to tackle undeclared work.

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Improved protection for migrant workers, France

02 June 2013
  • France
  This measure aims to strengthen the financial sanctions used against employers who hire undocumented migrant workers by making the employer either pay the worker or, if they have left the country, pay a public body damages. It is also a way of increasing the social rights and improving the finances of migrant workers.  
  • Type of measure:

    Deterrence: increase penalties, Prevention

Strengthening non-financial sanctions, France

02 June 2013
  • France
  This measure aims to prevent employers from using undeclared workers by increasing the use of non-financial penalties. The aim is to reduce the prevalence of undeclared work and to encourage employers to comply with the law. Penalties can include being barred from tendering for public works for a period, being excluded from receiving financial support from the state or being forced to close down the establishment for three months.  
  • Type of measure:

    Deterrence: increase penalties, Prevention

Measures to prevent undeclared work by subcontractors, France

02 June 2013
  • France
  Prior to 2011, main contractors had to demand documentation from subcontractors demonstrating that they did not employ illegal workers and fulfilled their obligations to pay social security contributions. Under the new law, the subcontractors now have to provide a certificate, provided by social security bodies, to show they fulfil their legal obligations to their employees and pay social security contributions.  
  • Type of measure:

    Prevention

Universal service employment cheque, France

28 October 2009
  • France
Due to cumbersome ‘red tape’ and the extensive administrative procedures required under French law to employ a domestic worker, many households have found it easier to employ undeclared workers. Thus, the French government has introduced various incentive schemes over the last 15 years to simplify procedures for legally recruiting domestic workers and to combat undeclared work. The most recent scheme is the ‘Universal service employment cheque’ introduced in 2006.
  • Sectors

  • Type of measure:

Enterprise service employment voucher, France

28 October 2009
  • France
The heavy administrative procedure involved can discourage companies and workers from registering casual work carried out on an occasional basis. In order to simplify the formalities for companies wishing to hire temporary or casual staff and reduce the levels of undeclared work, the French government introduced an employment voucher scheme in April 2009. The scheme combines two previous initiatives, which came into effect in 2005.
  • Sectors

  • Type of measure:

Coordinated strategy against undeclared work, France

28 October 2009
  • France
Since 1997, France has been working towards a more integrated approach in its efforts to combat illegal and undeclared work. Institutions have been set up, most notably the Interministerial Delegation for Combating Illegal Work (Délégation Interministérielle à la Lutte Contre le Travail Illégal, DILTI), as well as agencies at regional and local level. The coordinated strategy has focused on the economic sectors most prone to undeclared work.
  • Sectors

  • Type of measure: