Publications

Search results: 48 items found
  • Customised report
    25 september 2008

    At European level, the debate on flexicurity is currently high on the employment and social policy agenda. Member States are reflecting on the best way to adapt their systems to the ‘new reality’ of maintaining the balance between the need for flexibility in the labour market to allow companies to adapt their production methods and their workforce as a result of pressure from globalisation and technological progress while providing the necessary security for workers at the same time. This background paper was prepared for a hearing on the Commission’s Green Paper ‘Modernising labour law to meet the challenges of the 21st century’ held by the European Parliament Committee on Employment and Social Affairs on 21 March 2007.

  • Customised report
    25 september 2008

    This background paper, prepared for the European Parliament’s public hearing on ‘The Integration of economic migrant workers’ looks at the integration of migrants from countries outside the European Union as a two-way process. There is a need to balance the rights and obligations of both migrants and the receiving society. The receiving society should promote equal opportunities and non-discrimination for migrants in all key life domains, such as employment, education and housing. In return, incoming migrants should respect the fundamental values of the European Union and acquire a basic knowledge of the host society’s language, history and institutions.

  • Customised report
    25 september 2008

    This background paper has been drafted to coincide with the hearing of the European Parliament’s Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality (November 21st 2007, Brussels) on Women and Violence at work in the European Union. The European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions has a track record of research on workplace bullying, violence and discrimination going back to the 1990s. These negative aspects of the work experience have in particular been charted in successive waves of the European Working Conditions Survey [EWCS] from 1990/1-2005.

  • Customised report
    25 september 2008

    There is evidence to support the case that innovative working time and work–life balance policies can lead to a variety of positive impacts at company level, including enhanced employee performance, reduced absenteeism levels, better recruitment and retention potential as well as greater overall time efficiency. This background paper was written for the joint Foundation/European Parliament seminar on this theme, held in Brussels, 17 October 2006.

  • Customised report
    17 september 2008

    This background paper has been drafted in response to a request in June 2008 from the European Trade Union Committee for Education (ETUCE) for a summary of Eurofound research and data on the incidence of workplace violence in the education sector in the EU. Eurofound has a track record of research on workplace bullying, violence and discrimination going back to the 1990s. These negative dimensions of the work experience have in particular been charted in successive waves of the European Working Conditions survey [EWCS] from 1990–2005.

  • Customised report
    7 september 2007

    This background paper from the European Foundation has been drafted to coincide with the European Parliament’s hearing on 12 September 2007 in Brussels on the ‘Role of the minimum wage/minimum income for social inclusion in the EU’. The focus of the paper is on minimum wage provisions in Europe; it represents a brief synthesis of relevant Foundation research, supplemented with OECD/Eurostat data where such data is more up to date. It aims to give, in summary fashion, an overview of developments in minimum wage/minimum income provision at Member State level. It also aims to outline the perspectives of the social partners and provide some pointers regarding current and emerging policy issues.

  • Customised report
    28 augusti 2007

    The research indicates that financial participation can deliver real benefits for employees, enterprises and national economies. However, despite this potential, it remains little used in most Member States, and is very unevenly distributed across the EU. This background paper has updated the Foundation’s research on financial participation using employee data for the first time, from the fourth European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS).

  • Customised report
    22 november 2006

    Although collective agreements and minimum wage laws are in principle gender-neutral, women still end up earning less than men. This paper briefly explores some different facets of the ‘gender pay gap’ issue, based on data collected from two of the Foundation’s projects: the European Industrial Relations Observatory (EIRO) report Pay developments (2005), and the fourth European Working Conditions Survey, published early in 2007.