Publications

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Latest publications

  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    Recent statistics from Danmarks Statistik, the official statistical office,
    show that unskilled male workers' share of total employment in Denmark has
    remained unchanged at 18% over the period from 1980 to 1996. Overall, the
    share of all unskilled workers dropped from 23% in 1980 to 20% in 1996. The
    largest change has occurred for unskilled female workers, whose share dropped
    from 26% in 1980 to 21% in 1996. Out of a workforce of 2.8 million,
    approximately one million workers are categorised as "unskilled" or
    "lower-skilled" in Denmark.

  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    A "High-Level Group" has advocated the continuation of the non-legalistic,
    "voluntarist" approach to industrial relations in Ireland, in a set of
    proposals aimed at tackling disputes over trade union recognition [1] rights
    for workers. The High-Level group, drawn from representatives of Government,
    state agencies, employer and trade union interests, was established in
    accordance with the current /Partnership 2000/ agreement between the social
    partners, which runs from January 1997 to March 2000 (IE9702103F [2]).

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/efemiredictionary/recognised-trade-union
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined/social-partners-agree-three-year-national-programme

  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    The adjustment of Spain's national minimum wage in line with the projected
    rate of inflation for 1998 is considered insufficient by the trade unions. A
    dispute has arisen owing to the loss of the minimum wage's purchasing power,
    repeated failures to increase it and its wide differential with the average
    national wage, at a time when the Spanish economy is progressing favourably.

  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    Swedish employees are entitled to leave of absence for a number of reasons,
    and the Government's plans to introduce yet another one - for starting or
    working in their own businesses - were not met with overwhelming enthusiasm
    when they were made public in spring 1997. The Swedish Employers'
    Confederation (Svenska Arbetsgivareföreningen, SAF) and the National Agency
    for Government Employers (Arbetsgivarverket) objected, and the Swedish Trade
    Union Confederation (Landsorganisationen, LO) doubted that there was a need
    for an act of the kind proposed.

  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    The Minister for Women's Affairs has made it clear that she wishes to make
    progress in 1998 on the issue of women's careers in enterprises. Studies in
    the past years have proven the existence of a "glass ceiling" through which
    women are unlikely to pass. An 11-point women's petition submitted to
    Parliament in 1997 put combating this glass ceiling first on the list of
    demands. Specifically, the petition suggested that companies should be
    excluded from public contracts and subsidies unless they had taken measures
    to employ women at all hierarchical levels in proportion to their share in
    the population. The Ministry sees little opportunity to go quite that far,
    but it does want to take action in this direction.

  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    There has, in recent years, been an increasing focus on corporate conduct in
    terms of social, ethical and environmental performance. The experience of
    large multinational corporations such as Nike and Shell, which have been
    faced with protest campaigns against their social and environmental policies,
    has galvanised actors in this area. Many organisations are beginning to
    recognise that their profitability in the long term depends as much on on
    their performance in satisfying the aspirations of their "stakeholders" -
    including customers, suppliers, employees, local communities, investors,
    governments, and interest groups - in terms of their social and environmental
    record, as it does on price and quality.

  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    Since the 1980s, intense product market competition among the industrialised
    countries has led to a search for new products and new methods of production.
    At the same time, new technology is changing the ways that labour markets
    work and UK labour institutions have increasingly come into question. The UK
    in particular has experienced a sharp decline in the coverage of collective
    bargaining and of unionisation. Most of these developments have either been
    the consequence of, or the reason for, increasing flexibility. Yet what is
    "flexibility", what does it mean and what is it doing?

  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    A new three-year collective agreement was signed at Cargolux SA, the
    Luxembourg air freight company, in December 1997. It contains substantial
    improvements, including the restoration of certain benefits lost in 1995.

  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    On 24 November 1997, the general meeting of the peak employers' association
    (Vereinigung der Arbeitgeberverbände in Bayern, VAB) in the federal state
    (Land) of Bavaria decided to merge with the Bavarian peak trade association
    (Landesverband der Bayerischen Industrie, LBI). The new Landpeak association
    for Bavarian enterprises is called Vereinigung der Bayerischen Wirtschaft
    (VBW). On 17 December the constituent assembly of the VBW elected Erich
    Sennebogen as president.

  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    Although half of the private sector bargaining area conducted collective
    bargaining in the spring (DK9705110F [1]), 1997 was a relatively peaceful
    year on the Danish labour market, with fewer conflicts than in previous years
    when bargaining occurred. According to statistics from the Danish Employers'
    Confederation (Dansk Arbejdsgiverforening, DA) the number of working days
    lost due to industrial action in 1997 - at 82,992 days - was significantly
    lower than in 1995 and 1993. The main reason for the lower figure is that
    only half of the private sector area conducted collective bargaining in 1997,
    while the whole area did so in 1995 and 1993.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined-working-conditions/the-1997-danish-collective-bargaining-round-completed

Series

  • European Quality of Life Surveys

    The European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) is carried out every four to five years since its inception in 2003, with the latest edition in 2016. It examines both the objective circumstances of people's lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. It covers issues around employment, income, education, housing, family, health and work–life balance. It also looks at subjective topics, such as people's levels of happiness and life satisfaction, and perceptions of the quality of society.

  • European Jobs Monitor

    This series brings together publications and other outputs of the European Jobs Monitor (EJM), which tracks structural change in European labour markets. The EJM analyses shifts in the employment structure in the EU in terms of occupation and sector and gives a qualitative assessment of these shifts using various proxies of job quality – wages, skill-levels, etc.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2016

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2016, the fourth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003. 

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2015

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2015, the sixth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 1996

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 1996, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2001

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2001, which was an extension of the EWCS 2000 to cover the then 12 acceding and candidate countries. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2000

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2000, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Company Survey 2004

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the first edition of the survey carried out in 2004–2005 under the name European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance. 

  • European Company Survey 2009

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the ECS 2009, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2004–2005 as the European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance. 

  • European Company Survey 2013

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the ECS 2013, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2004–2005 as the European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance.

Forthcoming publications