European Working Conditions Survey 2005

Publication series
Published between
20 April 2007 - 27 Oktober 2011
Includes: 9 publications and 0 working papers

Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2005, the fourth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • Publications

    • Report
      27 Oktober 2011
      Non-standard employment and, more particularly, part-time work has been increasing worldwide for the past two decades. This trend has been especially strong in Europe, where the issue of different working time arrangements is an important part of the discussion among policymakers and social partners, and something which the European Union (EU) has promoted to increase flexibility for workers and employers. However, part-time work is spread very unevenly across Member States, reflecting differences in legislation, infrastructure and cultural conventions.
    • Report
      13 April 2010

      This background paper has been prepared to complement the findings of a comparative analysis by Eurofound on what has been termed ‘very atypical work’ in the 27 EU Member States. In the background paper, the definition of very atypical forms of work includes non-written employment contracts, contracts of less than 10 working hours a week and very short fixed-term contracts of six months or less.

    • Report
      23 März 2010

      This report reviews the policy contribution of the fourth EWCS, paying particular attention to the: contribution that the survey currently makes to debates and action regarding specific EU social and employment policies and concerns; potential contribution of the survey in identifying new policy concepts that can capture more complex concerns, in the way that ‘flexicurity’ and ‘job quality’ have done in previous research.

    • Report
      28 Oktober 2009

      This report outlines the current situation regarding work intensity, indicating a clear link between work intensity and poor working conditions, both physical and psychological. The analysis is based on findings from the fourth European Working Conditions Survey carried out in 31 countries, including the 27 EU Member States. The analysis reveals sharp variations between different Member States in relation to working hours and the associated gender gap, and points to the huge costs both for workers and companies arising from high work intensity. 

    • Report
      6 November 2008

      Skills, skills, skills! This is the mantra of modern labour and social policies. Up-skilling is seen as a win-win solution and it is commonly agreed that up-skilling lies in the interests of individual employees, as well as employers and, indeed, society at large. This paper will address the situation of low-skilled workers in the EU27 Member States by analysing cross-sectional data showing the distribution of such workers in these countries and analysing their working conditions compared to those of other groups of workers.

    • Report
      21 September 2008

      The report highlights four factors which are key to shaping the age structure of Europe’s workforce: ensuring career and employment security; maintaining and promoting the health and well-being of workers; developing skills and competencies; and reconciling working and non-working life. The findings show that improving working conditions leads to better job sustainability over the lifecycle, which in turn can prevent early exit from the labour market and encourage stronger participation rates among older workers. The analysis is based on findings from the fourth European Working Conditions Survey carried out in 31 countries, including the 27 EU Member States.

    • Report
      21 September 2008

      This report examines the extent of occupational segregation by gender and how it impacts on the quality of women’s and men’s working lives. The analysis is based on findings from the fourth European Working Conditions Survey carried out across 31 countries, including the 27 EU Member States. The report highlights differences between men and women in key aspects of job quality, such as working hours, job satisfaction, work–life compatibility and work-related health outcomes.

    • Résumé
      19 März 2008

      Die Arbeit spielt im Leben der meisten Europäer eine wesentliche Rolle. Auf der Ebene der EU-Politik wurde erkannt, dass das Wissen um die Bedingungen, unter denen die Menschen in den verschiedenen Ländern der EU arbeiten, für eine bessere Qualität der Arbeit, eine gesteigerte Produktivität sowie eine höhere Beschäftigung – der so genannten Zielsetzungen von Lissabon – eine zentrale Rolle spielt. Die europäische Erhebung über Arbeitsbedingungen, die alle fünf Jahre von der Europäischen Stiftung zur Verbesserung der Lebensund Arbeitsbedingungen durchgeführt wird, hat seit 1990 wertvolle Einblicke in Themen im Zusammenhang mit der Qualität der Arbeit geliefert. Diese vierte Erhebung präsentiert die Ansichten der Arbeitnehmer zu einem breiten Themenspektrum, u. a. Arbeitsorganisation, Arbeitszeiten, Chancengleichheit, Ausbildung, Gesundheit und Wohlbefinden sowie Arbeitszufriedenheit.

    • Résumé
      20 April 2007

      Die Erhebungen über Arbeitsbedingungen in Europa (EWCS) werden seit 1991 alle fünf Jahre durchgeführt. Sie bieten einzigartige Einblicke in die Entwicklung von Arbeit und Beschäftigung der letzten 15 Jahre in der Europäischen Union. Ende 2005 führte die Stiftung zur Verbesserung der Lebens- und Arbeitsbedingungen die vierte Erhebung durch. Rund 30.000 Arbeitnehmer aus 31 europäischen Ländern wurden befragt, die Angaben zu mehr als 100 Fragen in Bezug auf unterschiedliche Aspekte ihrer Arbeits- und Beschäftigungsbedingungen machten.

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