Publications

17187 items found

Eurofound publishes its work in a range of publication formats to match audience needs and the nature of the output. These include flagship reports on a particular area of activity, research reports summarising the findings of a research project and policy briefs presenting policy pointers from research projects or facts and figures relevant to policy debates. Also included are blog articles, regular articles on working life in Europe, presentations, working papers providing background material to ongoing or already concluded research, and reports arising from ad hoc requests by policymakers. Other corporate publications include annual reports, brochures and promotional publications. Web databases and online resources such as data visualisation applications are available in Data and resources.


  • Bulgaria: Latest developments in working life Q2 2019

    A wage increase for city transport workers in Sofia, the rise in the number of violations of labour rights in 2018 and changes to a training voucher scheme for employed people are the main topics of interest in this article. This country update reports on the latest developments in working life in Bulgaria in the second quarter of 2019.
  • Cyprus: Latest developments in working life Q2 2019

    The expected resolution to the dispute in the construction industry, deadlocked negotiations on the renewal of collective agreements in the hotel industry and work stoppages by contract workers in the public sector are the main topics of interest in this article. This country update reports on the latest developments in working life in Cyprus in the second quarter of 2019.
  • Czechia: Latest developments in working life Q2 2019

    The outcome of negotiations between social partners on an amendment to the Labour Code, tripartite negotiations on increasing salaries in the public sector in 2020 and the impact of the digital transformation on Czechia are the main topics of interest in this article. This country update reports on the latest developments in working life in Czechia in the second quarter of 2019.
  • Germany: Latest developments in working life Q2 2019

    The current economic and labour market situation in Germany, fixed-term employment, collective bargaining to adapt working conditions in eastern Germany and the European Court of Justice judgement on recording working time are the main topics of interest in this article. This country update reports on the latest developments in working life in Germany in the second quarter of 2019.
  • Denmark: Latest developments in working life Q2 2019

    A political agreement to strengthen and coordinate efforts to improve the Danish work environment, a new act for the psychological working environment and a strike by SAS pilots are the main topics of interest in this article. This country update reports on the latest developments in working life in Denmark in the second quarter of 2019.
  • United Kingdom: Latest developments in working life Q2 2019

    The resignation of the prime minister, the growing gig economy, the launch of two new trade unions and compensation for blacklisted construction workers are the main topics of interest in this article. This country update reports on the latest developments in working life in the United Kingdom in the second quarter of 2019.
  • To have or have not: A statutory minimum wage

    ​​​​​​​Cyprus and Italy are currently considering the introduction of a universal minimum wage floor by law. With this move, they would be joining 22 other EU Member States that already have one in place. In the remaining Member States – Austria, Denmark, Finland and Sweden – and in Norway, too, minimum wage rates are stipulated in sectoral collective agreements. This article reviews some examples of how EU countries set their minimum wages, why they opted for one or the other approach, and what impact their decision has had.
  • Member States still getting to grips with the single labour market

    The European Platform Tackling Undeclared Work last year documented the case of a Dutch temporary work agency that hired workers of various nationalities to work for a construction company in Belgium. The wages were suspiciously low, and the Belgian Labour Inspectorate believed that EU law guaranteeing such workers minimum rates of pay was being breached. Inspectors monitored and visited the company over several years, but it was only when they collaborated with the Dutch authorities that both were able to gather the necessary evidence and take steps to resolve the situation.
  • What will be the impact of the new Spanish minimum wage?

    The Socialist-led Spanish government that emerged last summer had, by the end of 2018, approved a hike in the statutory minimum wage. This was agreed with the left-wing Podemos party as part of an attempt to secure the parliamentary support needed for passing the proposed 2019 budget – although failure to do so resulted in the April election. The new minimum wage came into force on 1 January, rising from 14 monthly payments of €735.90 per year to €900 for those in full-time employment.
  • Quality of health and care services in the EU

    Public services are essential for achieving high levels of social protection, social cohesion and social inclusion. However, to be effective in this regard, services must be of good quality and they must be equally accessible to the broadest possible range of  citizens.

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